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Posts for tag: Eczema

By DeBlieck Dermatology
July 23, 2021
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Acne   Eczema   Psoriasis   Dry Skin   Bath Products  
Bath ProductsWhen you’re dealing with skin problems such as eczema or psoriasis, using the same skincare products that others do may end up being a major no-no. In fact, you need to pay close attention to the products you are currently using. Whether you’re noticing more flare-ups, or you are just concerned about how to care for your delicate skin, a dermatologist can be a helpful doctor to turn to. Here are some other tips that can help.

You Have Dry Skin

If you are dealing with very dry, itchy, and flaky skin then baths can actually make dry skin worse. This means that you’ll want to find products that prevent the body’s natural oils from being stripped away. Of course, while you may want to watch the temperature on that bathwater, this doesn’t mean that you can’t still enjoy a relaxing soak in the tub. Just look for soaps and bath products that contain coconut milk, which is incredibly hydrating. Not to mention, it will make your skin smell pretty great, too!

You Have Eczema

If you have eczema then bath time might be a real challenge; however, if you haven’t tried it yet you need to look for bath products that contain colloidal oatmeal. Instead of using a bubble bath or other products that could exacerbate eczema, use a colloidal oatmeal bath soak instead. This product is great for itchy, dry, and red skin caused by eczema. It can also be ideal for those with sunburns and poison ivy rashes.

You Have Acne-Prone Skin

Acne doesn’t just appear on the face, you may also notice embarrassing breakouts on your shoulders, back, legs, or other parts of the body, too. If you are prone to breakouts, it’s important to find a product that won’t make acne worse while also removing excess oil from the skin. One option is Epsom salts.

Not only are they great for reducing inflammation but they also help to exfoliate the skin to remove the buildup of dead skin cells, which in turn prevents clogged pores. Soaps with tea tree oil, sulfur, or charcoal may also be great for keeping pores clean and removing impurities in the skin.

You Have Psoriasis

When it comes to psoriasis, gentle bath products are key! Look for body wash rather than soap, which can actually alter the pH of the skin and lead to further dryness. Instead, look for a gentle, fragrance-free body wash. You’ll also want to ease off the hot water and instead opt for lukewarm water when bathing or showering. Just like with eczema, colloidal oatmeal can also be soothing for psoriasis plaques.

If in doubt, your dermatologist is a wellspring of information to help you find the ideal products for your skin. A dermatologist will also know what ingredients and products to avoid based on the skin problems you’re facing. Ask your dermatologist today!
By DeBlieck Dermatology
November 18, 2020
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Eczema  
Understanding and Treating EczemaIf you notice recurring bouts of red, scaly, itchy patches of skin then you could be dealing with eczema. Eczema refers to a variety of skin conditions that cause plaques that can sometimes ooze, crust over, and lead to infection. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with eczema, you must seek professional dermatology care from qualified skin-care professionals.

What triggers eczema?

It’s important to figure out what triggers your eczema so you can make lifestyle changes to avoid exposure. Common eczema triggers include:
  • Cold or hot weather
  • Dry skin
  • Stress
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Fragrances and detergents
  • Dust mites, pollen, and mold
  • Exercise
By being aware of your triggers you can reduce eczema flare-ups without always having to rely on medication. In the beginning, you may want to keep track of your symptoms to discuss with your dermatologist.

How can I manage my eczema symptoms?

While there is no cure for eczema, a dermatologist can help you get your symptoms under control. First and foremost, you mustn't scratch your skin, as scratching will only make the itching more intense. Scratching your skin can also lead to more serious problems including infections.

It’s also important to establish a proper skin-care regimen with your dermatologist to determine which products are not only safe to use but also can ease eczema symptoms. It’s best to choose mild products that do not contain fragrances or chemicals and to keep skin moisturized, as dry skin can lead to flare-ups.

Of course, your dermatologist can also provide you with prescription topical creams and medications to help control your symptoms. Sometimes laser therapy can also help if you are dealing with severe eczema symptoms that don’t seem to respond to traditional medications and lifestyle changes.

Whether you are experiencing symptoms of eczema or you’ve already been diagnosed with eczema, you must have a skin-care professional that can help you get your eczema under control with proper dermatology treatments and remedies.
By DeBlieck Dermatology
December 13, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Eczema  

Do you have itchy, scaly rashes? If so, you could have eczema, a common skin condition that could be effectively treated by your dermatologist. Eczema is also called atopic dermatitis, and it can be caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to harsh chemicals. Dry skin can also affect your skin’s ability to form a barrier to allergens, which can lead to eczema. Another common cause of eczema is genetics. If someone in your family suffers from eczema, it increases your chances of developing eczema as well. Immune system problems can also cause eczema.

Both adults and children can develop eczema, however, children are most often affected, especially before they reach the age of five. Eczema develops into a chronic skin condition, with intermittent flare-ups. These flare-ups can often be accompanied by hay fever or asthma.

There are many common signs and symptoms of eczema, including:

  • Reddish-brown patches on your feet, hands, ankles, knees, chest, elbows, face, and scalp
  • Chronic, severe itching which often worsens at night
  • Inflamed, raw, red, sensitive, and swollen skin
  • Dry, cracked, scaly skin patches on various areas of your body
  • Bumps appearing on your skin which drain fluid and crust over later

For mild cases of eczema, there are a few simple home remedies you can try, including:

  • Taking over-the-counter antihistamine medications
  • Smoothing calamine or other anti-itch lotion over your skin
  • Applying moisturizer when you take a shower
  • Applying cool, wet dressings and bandages to affected areas
  • Taking a warm baking soda or oatmeal bath
  • Placing a humidifier in your home to moisten dry air
  • Wearing breathable, cool, cotton clothing

For moderate to severe cases of eczema, you should visit your dermatologist. There are several effective professional treatments your dermatologist may recommend, such as:

  • Prescription-strength oral and topical medications to stop itching
  • Antibiotic medications to eliminate any underlying infection
  • Oral or injectable anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling and pain
  • Corticosteroid dressings to reduce inflammation
  • Natural light or ultraviolet therapy to reduce or eliminate skin patches

You don’t have to suffer with eczema when relief is just a phone call away. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of eczema by calling your dermatologist today!

By DEBLIECK DERMATOLOGY
May 15, 2018
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Eczema  

Eczema is a chronic skin condition that produces itchy rashes that are scaly, dry, and leathery. It can appear anywhere on the body and mostEczema often appears in the creases of the arms, legs, and face. Something that many people may not know is that there are multiple types of eczema. They all share some common symptoms but are all different depending on the nature of what triggers the reaction and the location of the rash.

Types of Eczema           

Atopic Dermatitis

This is the most frequent and common form of eczema and it’s thought to be caused by the body’s immune system functioning abnormally. It’s characterized by itchy, inflamed skin and typically runs in families. Atopic Dermatitis usually flares up and goes away intermittently throughout a person’s life.

Contact Dermatitis

This is caused when the skin comes in contact with an irritant such as certain chemicals. Finding what triggers a breakout is important so that it can be prevented in the future. Triggers may be things like laundry detergent, body soap, fabrics, poison ivy, and more.

Dyshidrotic Dermatitis

Dyshidrotic Dermatitis usually affects the palms and soles of the feet. It is characterized by clear, deep blisters that itch and burn and occurs frequently during summer months and in warm areas.

Neurodermatitis

This form of eczema is a chronic skin inflammation caused by a cycle of scratching to a localized itch, such as a mosquito bite or spider bite. It’s characterized by scaly patches of skin, usually on the head, lower legs, wrists, and forearms. The skin may become thickened and leathery.

Nummular Dermatitis

This form is characterized by round patches of irritated skin that can be crusted, scaly, and very itchy. It frequently appears on the back, arms, buttocks, and lower legs.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

This is a common condition that causes yellow, oily, and scaly patches on the scalp, face, and other body parts. Dandruff is a form of Seborrheic Dermatitis. This form of eczema doesn’t always itch. Triggers can include weather, oily skin, emotional stress, and infrequent shampooing.

Stasis Dermatitis

This appears on the lower legs of older people and is related to circulation and vein problems. Symptoms can include itching and red-brown discoloration on the skin the legs. As the condition progresses it can lead to blistering, oozing, and skin lesions.

Eczema comes in all shapes and sizes and can be triggered by many things. If you have questions about eczema or want to make an appointment, call our office today!

By DEBLIECK DERMATOLOGY
September 15, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Eczema  

EczemaEczema, also called “dermatitis,” refers to several different rash-like conditions where the skin is inflamed, red and irritated. The most severe and long-lasting type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. During a flare-up, the skin becomes extremely red, itchy and scaly. This skin condition can be widespread, or confined to only a few areas on the body.

Eczema is not contagious, although if you have a family history of eczema, your risk for the disease increases. Generally, atopic dermatitis affects infants or young children and may last until the child reaches adulthood.

The appearance and symptoms for atopic dermatitis will vary for each case. Intense itching is the most common sign of eczema, which can lead to severe discomfort and even loss of sleep. Other common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry, red and extremely itchy patches of skin
  • Cracked, inflamed and scaly skin
  • Small bumps or blisters that ooze and weep
  • In infants, the rash generally appears on the cheeks and around the mouth

Eczema outbreaks are caused by an overreaction of your skin’s immune system to environmental and emotional triggers, such as temperature, chemicals, dust, mold or stress. While there is currently no cure, eczema sufferers can practice self-care at home to help reduce flare-ups. Lifestyle adjustments are the best line of defense in controlling all types of eczema. Goals of treatment include reducing inflammation, decreasing risk of infection and alleviating the itch. To minimize symptoms and outbreaks:

  • Moisturize every day to prevent dryness and cracking.
  • Limit contact with irritants, such as soaps, clothing, jewelry, foods and detergents.
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperatures as overheating and sweating are common triggers of flare-ups.
  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Minimize exposure to mold, pollens and animal dander.
  • Opt for cotton, loose-fitting clothes and avoid wool and other rough materials.

Treatment for eczema begins with a proper diagnosis from your dermatologist. If you are diagnosed with eczema, your dermatologist can explain your type of eczema and can work with you to tailor a treatment plan that meets your individual needs to effectively manage the symptoms.