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By DeBlieck Dermatology
May 10, 2022
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Rash  

Wondering when a rash is a cause for concern?

We’re all going to deal with a rash at some point, and while the good news is that many of them can be treated from the comfort of your own home, sometimes you will need to turn to a dermatologist for medication. Here are the causes of a rash,

Fungal Infection

One of the most common fungal infections that result in a rash is ringworm. Fungal infections can also affect the nails and hair. Yeast infections caused by the candida fungus can also result in rashes of the mouth, groin, or vagina. Less common fungal infections may result in those with compromised immune systems (e.g., patients who have HIV).

Minor fungal infections may be treated with over-the-counter anti-fungal creams or ointments. A dermatologist should treat more severe or persistent fungal infections.

Viral Infection

The most common virus to produce a rash is the herpes simplex virus, both type 1 and type 2. Type 1 usually causes cold sores of the lips and nose, while type 2 leads to sores on the genitals. Those with an HSV flare-up may develop a tender rash on the palms. Chickenpox and shingles (caused by the herpes zoster virus) also result in itching, burning, and painful rashes.

Epstein-Barr virus, best known as mononucleosis or “mono,” can also lead to a mild rash that appears within a few days of being infected. If you develop a rash, a sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, and a fever, you should see a doctor.

Bacterial Infection

Staphylococcus (e.g., folliculitis; cellulitis; impetigo) and streptococcus (e.g., strep throat; scarlet fever) are two common bacterial infections that lead to a rash. Sometimes Lyme disease is characterized by a bull’s eye-like rash surrounding the tick bite.

Parasitic Infections

Parasites that cause a rash include lice and scabies, which can be passed from person to person. Lice most commonly affect the scalp, while scabies can cause an itchy, pimple-like rash that usually appears on the armpits, wrists, elbows, beltline, and buttocks.

Other Causes

Noninfectious rashes are also caused by drugs, eczema (e.g., atopic dermatitis), allergic dermatitis, autoimmune disorders (e.g., lupus), and food allergies.

It isn’t easy to tell what’s causing your rash, but if you are dealing with new, worsening, or severe symptoms or the rash is spreading, it’s always good to turn to your dermatologist for treatment.

By DeBlieck Dermatology
April 21, 2022
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Dermatologist  

When should you turn to a dermatologist?

Minor skin, hair or nail issues may be treated by your general physician; however, they won’t have the same expertise and knowledge as a dermatologist. After all, a dermatologist is a medical specialist who understands the complex inner workings and function of the hair, skin and nails. This also means more knowledgeable, well-rounded care. Here are just some of the top benefits of turning to a dermatologist.

They Can Help You Get Acne Under Control

Acne is certainly not an easy thing to treat and sometimes over-the-counter options just aren’t enough. Luckily, a dermatologist understands the different causes of acne and can provide the proper treatment based on whether your acne is due to hormones, bacteria or inflammation. A dermatologist can also prescribe stronger oral and topical medications, as well as other therapies and treatments options to improve your acne-prone skin.

They Can Detect Skin Cancer Early

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and melanoma is a deadly form of skin cancer that must be detected early. The best way to detect both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer is through annual skin cancer screenings with your dermatologist. They are painless and only take a couple of minutes. A screening simply involves examining your skin from head to toe, checking for any suspicious growths or moles that may require further testing.

They Can Treat Hair Loss

Skin isn’t the only thing that dermatologists are experts in, they also know hair and nails. So if you are dealing with hair loss you may want to turn to a dermatologist for answers. After all, hair loss can be distressing and nothing is more important than figuring out what’s causing hair loss so you know how to treat it. Everything from hormones to heredity to certain medical conditions can be to blame, and a dermatologist can determine the cause of your hair loss and provide a variety of treatment options.

Provide Recommendations and Advice

We all know that when it comes to caring for skin, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach. Everything from acne and sun damage to wrinkles and eczema can impact the health and appearance of your skin and a dermatologist can provide recommendations and tips customized to fit your needs and skincare goals.

If you are dealing with any injuries, conditions or issues that are impacting the health of your skin, hair or nails, a dermatologist is going to be the ideal medical professional to turn to. Don’t ignore your symptoms. Get the treatment you deserve to get your issues under control.

By DeBlieck Dermatology
April 08, 2022
Category: Skin Care

Protect your skin against cancer and spot early warning signs.

Skin cancer remains one of the most prevalent cancers in the US; however, one of the biggest causes of skin cancer is also completely preventable: Exposure to UV light (both natural and artificial) can impact your likelihood of developing skin cancer at some point during your lifetime. While seeing a dermatologist once a year for a skin cancer screening is important, here are some tips that you can start following now to reduce your risk for skin cancer,

Apply Sunscreen Every Day

If you’re going to spend any time out in the sun you need to apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Opt for a sunscreen with at least SPF 30 and make sure to apply a generous amount (about 1 ounce of sunscreen for the entire body) at least 15 minutes before going outside.

Reapply Sunscreen Throughout the Day

If you’re going to go outside, the best bet is to always apply sunscreen, even if you’re just going for a drive (the sun’s rays can still reach your skin through car windows and the sunroof). Yes, the sun’s rays can even damage your skin on rainy, cloudy and snowy days! If you’re spending a considerable amount of time outdoors (e.g. playing sports or enjoying the beach) you will want to reapply sunscreen every 2 hours, or immediately after getting out of the water. The same rule applies if you’re sweating. You can never reapply too often!

Know the Best Times to Go Outside

The sun’s rays are most potent between the hours of 10 am-3 pm. This means that you are more likely to get sunburned during these hours (it can take less than 15 minutes to get sunburned). So, if you spend hours outside you can only imagine just how bad this can be on your skin. Limit time in the sun during these hours, or at the very least use an umbrella or seek the shade if you must be outside.

Recognize the Early Warning Signs of Skin Cancer

The only way to catch skin cancer early when it’s treatable is by performing self-exams on your body at least once a month. Make sure that you are checking every area of your body, from your scalp to between your toes. After all, while skin cancer most often develops in areas exposed to the sun, this isn’t always the case.

When examining growths and moles you should look for changes in,

  • Color
  • Shape
  • Symmetry
  • Size

Healthy moles stay relatively the same over time, so if you notice any changes that have you concerned then it’s time to schedule a skin cancer evaluation with a dermatologist.

With summer just around the corner, it’s important that you protect your skin from cancer and sun-related damage. If you’ve never gotten a skin cancer screening, it’s a simple, painless checkup performed by a dermatologist, and it shouldn’t be missed.

By DeBlieck Dermatology
March 28, 2022
Category: Skin Treatments
Tags: Birthmarks  
Treating Your BirthmarksDo you have a birthmark? Chances are pretty good you do. After all, most people do. Birthmarks come in all shapes, colors, and sizes, and can develop anywhere on the body. While these markings typically aren’t anything to worry about, you may wish to see a dermatologist about your birthmark if it negatively impacts your appearance or begins to change appearance.

Most Birthmarks are Harmless

As we mentioned before, most birthmarks won’t cause you any harm or affect the health of your skin. Of course, some birthmarks could potentially cause complications and should be monitored by a dermatologist. For example, a strawberry mark can sometimes evolve into an open wound and become infected. If you’ve been told that your birthmark is a melanocytic nevus, then this is something that should be monitored regularly to make sure that it doesn’t develop into cancer later in life.

Treating a Birthmark

If you are feeling a bit self-conscious about your birthmark you’ll be happy to hear that many of them will fade over time. Of course, you may want to talk with your dermatologist about birthmark removal options if the birthmark you have could potentially cause some health risks for you or if your birthmark embarrasses you.

It’s always a good idea to talk to a dermatologist who can assess whether the benefits of having your birthmark removed outweigh the cons. For example, birthmarks that could potentially affect vision or hearing should be removed. Some removal methods include:
  • Corticosteroids: injections or oral steroids can stop the birthmark from growing and can shrink it
  • Interferon alfa-12: this can also shrink the birthmark (particularly if corticosteroids do not work effectively)
  • Laser therapy: can be used on certain birthmarks like port wine stains
Surgery may be necessary only if these other treatment options haven’t provided the proper results or if the birthmark is causing other health issues. The type of treatment you need will depend on your health, the type and location of your birthmark, and whether it’s causing any complications.

Whether you want to find out if you should have a birthmark removed or you just want to schedule a skin cancer screening, a dermatologist can help you make important decisions regarding treatment options and your skin health.
By DeBlieck Dermatology
March 10, 2022
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Mole   Irregular Mole  
Irregular MoleEducating the public on skin cancer is incredibly important. After all, you’re the one that looks at your skin every day, so you should know how to spot early warning signs of skin cancer. While there are certain risk factors that can increase your risk for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, it’s important for everyone to visit a dermatologist once a year for a comprehensive skin cancer screening. In the meantime, here’s what to look out for.

What is an irregular or atypical mole?

Medically referred to as dysplastic nevi, these irregular moles are benign but having them could put you at an increased risk for developing melanoma over your lifetime. These moles can develop anywhere on the body but are most often found on sun-exposed areas of the skin. Since these moles vary greatly in appearance it’s important to monitor your moles regularly so you can recognize when unusual changes are occurring and call your dermatologist.

What does an irregular mole look like?

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) offers a simple ABCDE guideline to follow to be able to spot unusual or suspicious changes in a mole. Here’s what the ABCDEs stand for:

Asymmetry: when the halves of the moles don’t match each other in shape or appearance this could be a sign of a cancerous mole
Border: a jagged, irregular, or scalloped border can be a sign of melanoma
Color: if a mole has multiple colors or changes color this is also a warning sign not to ignore
Diameter: melanoma is often larger than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser), even though they can be smaller
Evolving: healthy moles stay relatively the same over the years so if your mole bleeds, crusts over, itches, or changes appearance you should schedule an appointment with your dermatologist

When should I see a dermatologist?

If you have any concerns about a mole don’t hesitate to call your dermatologist to have it checked out. The sooner melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are detected and removed the better. Of course, everyone can benefit from visiting a dermatologist at least once a year for a comprehensive skin cancer screening. You should also be performing self-exams once a month to keep track of your moles.

If you have an irregular mole or a mole that’s changing in appearance, it’s best to play it safe and schedule an evaluation with a dermatologist who can examine the mole to make sure it hasn’t turned cancerous.




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